Library Tutorials
close
Font size options
Increase or decrease the font size for this website by clicking on the 'A's.
Contrast options
Choose a color combination to give the most comfortable contrast.
Historic Provo

PROVO CITY TIMELINE

 Date  Event
 About 1300   The ancestors of the Utes settled in Utah Valley.
 About 1500  The Utes consisted of ten distinct bands, two of which occupied parts of Utah Valley. Utah Lake was the western edge of the area occupied by the Uintah band which extended from the lake eastward to the Uinta Basin and the Tavaputs Plateau (much of Uintah and Duchesne counties). The other band, the Timpamogots (Timpanogots, Timpanogos), dwelt along the southern and eastern shores of Utah Lake. 
 1776   Two Catholic Priests, Fathers Escalante and Domínguez led an expedition from Santa Fe that looped up into a corner of Utah Valley seeking a northern route out to California.
 1824-1825  Etienne Provost followed the Provo River down into Utah Valley and set up a trading post near Utah Lake.
 1847  Mormons from Salt Lake explored Utah Valley.
 March 1849  First Mormon colonists left the Salt Lake Valley and headed out to establish a colony in the Utah Valley to the south. The group of about 150 individuals were under the leadership of John S. Higbee.
 April 1849  The colonists began settling and constructing a fort, known as "Fort Utah", south of the Provo River1 and upstream a couple of miles from Utah Lake.
 April 1850  New fort built northwest of the first one (where North Park is located).
 1850  A log schoolhouse was constructed inside the second fort.
 1850  Territorial Legislature passed a law that gave certain men control of a stagecoach line from Ogden to Salt Lake City, Provo, Manti, and the county seat of Iron County.2
 1850  Log schoolhouse was constructed and school was taught there by Mary Ann Turner.
 6 February 1851  A city charter, granted by the Territorial Legislature, gave boundaries to the city, specified duties of elected officials, described duties of town residents, and provided instruction for city council members consisting of the mayor, four aldermen, and nine councilors.3
 19 March 1851  Utah Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized in Provo.
 April 1851  Ellis Eames began serving as Provo's first mayor.4
 1853  Territorial Legislature passed laws creating The Provo Canal and Irrigation Company. The company was given one half of the water of the Provo River to manage for purposes of irrigation and generation of power. Also created at this time was the Provo Manufacturing Company.5
 18 June 1856  A sawmill constructed by John Mills and his son, Martin, began operation, sawing its first logs.
 1856  Construction began on the first Tabernacle or "Old Meeting House." This building was basically completed in 1861, plastered in 1866-1867, and thereafter dedicated in 1867. The building stood facing Center Street until it was torn down in 1918.
 Mid 1850s  A two-story "seminary" building was constructed which was used as a school.
 1858  Brigham Young and other Mormons deserted Salt Lake City and moved to Provo when a U.S. Army threatened to enter the Capital.6
 1859  Judge John Cradlebaugh convened court for the first time in Provo to investigate alleged LDS crimes.7
 1860-1861  Five schoolhouses were built, one for each district.
 1860  Provo Fourth Ward schoolhouse was built at 100 East and 100 North. The building was used for church services until 1866 when the 4th Ward chapel was constructed.8
 1862  The City Council was changed to include a mayor and two aldermen and three councilors.
 1862  Brothers Warren N. and Wilson H. Dusenberry arrived in Provo. Warren taught in the 1st Ward school for one year and then began his own.
 About 1863  The Dusenberry school became the Timpanogos Branch of the University of Deseret.
 21 January 1864  City council changed to a mayor, at least three aldermen, and five councilors.
 1864  First canal completed to take water to Provo bench.9
 1866  Provo Fourth Ward chapel constructed. 10
 1866  Taylor Brothers Store opened for business. They sold furniture initially, adding a music department in 1872, floor coverings in 1875, and stoves and hardware in 1888.
 December 1866  Deseret Telegraph extended down through Provo and beyond.11
 Spring 1867  Construction of the first Utah County Courthouse was completed.
 1867  Provo Pressed Brick began to be used in addition to or instead of adobe bricks.
 1867  The first Tabernacle or "Old Meeting House" was dedicated. Begun in 1856 and basically completed by 1861, this dedication did not occur until the plastering was complete. The building stood facing Center Street until it was torn down in 1918.
 19 May 1869  The Transcontinental Railroad was completed.
 1 June 1869  Timpanogos Manufacturing Company was founded (later to become the Provo Woolen Mills).
 About 1870  The beginning of party politics in Utah. The People's Party and the Liberal Party both organized.
 22 September 1870  Federal troops raided Provo.12
 January 1871  The Provo Co-op was founded.13
 1872 or 1873  First railroad reached Provo.14
 1 August 1873  First Provo newspaper, the Provo Daily Times, published.15
 1875  William D. Startup began making candy in Provo.
 1875  J. W. Hooper built the Provo Flour Mill at 500 North 200 West.16
 16 October 1875  Lewis Building at 300 West Center Street is purchased by Brigham Young. Brigham Young Academy founded.
 1 January 1876  Warren Dusenberry appointed first principal for the first term of Brigham Young Academy.
 3 January 1876  First classes of the Brigham Young Academy held in the Lewis Building at 300 West Center street.
 21 August 1876  Brigham Young Academy dedicated.
 18 January 1877  Ordinance increased the number of aldermen to four and the number of councilors to eight.
 1877  Excelsior Roller Mills established by J. W. Hoover.17
 1877  Thomas Cordner family became the first to live on the Provo Bench for an entire year.18
 1878  First gravel sidewalks in Provo.19
 1878  Utah County silk industry organized.20
 1881    Denver and Rio Grande Railroad reached Provo.21
 1882  Esther C. Pulsipher had the Occidental Boarding House built (later known as the Hotel Roberts). 
 1883  The Provo 5th Ward was divided and the Lakeview Ward was created.
 1883  Construction began on the Provo Tabernacle (Utah Stake Tabernacle).
 March 1883  The Denver and Rio Grande Railroad was completed. The railroad ran from Denver to Salt Lake and route took it right through Provo.
 14 June 1883  First telephone service in Provo. 22
 15 November 1883  Emily Clapp opened a small Protestant school, the forerunner of the Proctor Academy. The school first met in the front room of what was the Daniel's house at 200 East and 200 South.23
 27 January 1884  The Lewis Building burned down. At that time the Brigham Young Academy was housed in the Lewis Building.
 1 March 1884  The Congregational Church school moved from the Daniel's home to F. F. Bee's Harness Shop (on the south side of West Center street). They remained upstairs in the harness shop through 5 Sep 1887 after which the Proctor Academy opened.24
 10 September 1885  William D. and Julia Maria Roberts purchased the Occidental Boarding House and renamed it the Hotel Roberts.
 6 April 1886  General conference of the LDS Church held in the Provo Tabernacle. 
 6 September 1887  Proctor Academy opened. The Academy was run by the Congregational Church and was located on the Northwest corner of 100 South and 100 West.
 13 September 1887  First long-distance phone service to Salt Lake City. 25
 18 May 1889  City council approved 20-year franchise allowing the Rocky Mountain Telephone Company to operate in Provo.26
 1889  First congregation of Lutherans of the Augustana Synod in Provo.27
 1890  Provo school districts were consolidated into one school district which included the following schools: Central School (Fourth Ward), East School (First Ward), West School (Second Ward), Northeast School (Third Ward), North School no. 19, and Far North School.
 1890  Electricity power came to Provo. Generated by turbines located at the Provo Woolen Mills on 200 West.28
 15 December 1890  Mayor John E. Booth and Provo City Council signed an ordinance creating the Provo City Fire Department.29
 27 February 1891  American Baptist Church of Provo founded with fifteen members.30
 5 February 1891  Provo Congregational Church incorporated.31
 4 January 1892  First building of the Academy Square dedicated.
 1892  Small Episcopalian mission begun, the origins of St. Mary's Episcopal Church.32
 1892  Office of alderman abolished.
 1892  First piped waterworks completed, using mostly wooden pipes.33
 1892  Timpanogos Elementary School built. This first Timpanogos School was demolished in 1938 and replaced in the following year by the new Timpanogos School which opened in 1939.34
 November 1892  Schools were renamed:35   
 Central School became Parker School
 East School became Webster School
 West School became Franklin School
 Northwest School became Timpanogos School
 North School no. 19 became Page School
 Far North School became Mountain School
 1895  ZCMI (Zion's Clothing and Mercantile Institution) was established in 1895 and located at the intersection of 600 South and Academy (University) Avenue.36
 1895  Startup Candy Factory built. 37
 1896  Rio Grande Railway Company built branch line from Provo through Provo Canyon to Heber (Heber Creeper).38
 3 April 1897  First meeting of the Seventh-day Adventists.39
 1898  Webster School was sold off and the newly built Maeser School replaced it.
 17 April 1898  Provo Tabernacle dedicated.
 January 1901  Franklin School opened.
 1901  Provo Commercial Club begun to promote local businesses.40
 1901  Brigham Young Academy renamed Brigham Young University.
 1 February 1902  First postal delivery.41
 1902  Sometime during this year was when the "Lettered" streets running North and South and the numbered streets running East and West were changed to the current numbering system. "J" street became Academy avenue (now University Avenue).
 April 1902  The Provo 6th Ward was formed in April 1902 from portions of the Provo 1st and 2nd Wards. The Ward was bounded by University Avenue (Academy Avenue then) on the East, 500 West on the West, Center Street on the North and Utah Lake to the South (most lived above 600 South, however). These boundaries remained the same until the Spring of 1950 when the Provo 14th Ward was created by dividing the 6th Ward along 300 South. The 6th Ward building was located on the Northwest corner of 300 South and 200 West.
 29 November 1902  Provo's First Church of Christ, Scientist incorporated.42
 1 October 1903  Provo General Hospital opened. Located on the corner of 100 East and 200 South.43
 1903  Reed Smoot, a Provo resident, was elected to the U.S. Senate. The subsequent  investigations and hearing prevent him being seated in the Senate for several years. Re-elected in 1908, he served until 1933.
 1905  City council approved an independent company receive a telephone franchise, greatly expanded phone service.44
 15 December 1906  The Farmers and Merchants Bank opened at the northeast corner of 3rd West and Center Streets.
 1907  St. Mary's Episcopal Church was built on 200 North.
 1907  First cement sidewalks in Provo.45
 1908  The Parker School building was constructed. This was demolished in 1938 and replaced by the Joaquin School.
 1908  The first Provo High School opened. This was located about where the Provo City Fire Department is now located off of Center Street in Downtown Provo.
 December 1908  The Provo City Library began operating in the newly constructed Carnegie Library Building on the Northwest corner of 100 East and Center Streets.
 1909  Bell Telephone received another 20-year franchise, and it merged with the independent company.46
 1909  U.S. Post Office opened at 17 South Academy (University) Avenue.
 1909  U.S. President William Howard Taft pays a visit to Provo.
 23 February 1910  The Methodists and the Congregational Church of Provo combined and the Church was renamed the Community Church.47
 1911  Provo Train station completed.
 1912  A new Page School building was built. After some 40 years the school was closed and the building and real estate sold to BYU in 1958. The building was razed in July 1999 and replaced with a parking lot.48
 1912  First year commission form of city government, as mandated by 1911 state law for cities, like Provo, of the 2nd class.49
 1912  The "Timp Hike" an organized, annual event began and continued until 1972.
 1912  Utah Power and Light occupied a structure at 56 and 58 North Academy Avenue that later became the Academy Theater in 1941.
 1912  Provo High School established.
 6 November 1912  Groundbreaking for old BYU Women's Gym.
 20 April 1913  Pioneer Ward formed from the Provo 3rd Ward.
 1913  The Salt Lake & Utah R.R. reached Provo (often referred to as the Orem Interurban).
 1914  The Salt Lake & Utah R.R. was electrified.
 1915  First paving of Provo streets.50 Paving began with Center street between 100 West and 500 West, 1 block on University Avenue, and 1 block on 100 West (these were probably University from Center to 100 North and 100 West from Center to 100 North).
 1916  Orem Interurban Railroad extended from Provo to Payson.51
 1917  Provo City Fire Department purchased its first motorized fire engine.
 1917-1918  World War I caused many men to enlist and serve in the armed forces. On the home front, Provo residents raised "victory gardens" in support of the war effort.
 1918  Academy (University) Avenue was paved from Center to 300 South.
 19 July 1918  Serious fire damaged the Provo Woolen Mills, which never recovered.
 Winter 1918-19  Influenza epidemic.
 1919  Center Street was paved from 100 East to 700 East.
 1919  Work on the City-County Building began.
 1919  The first Provo High School building opened. This building was replaced by the new Provo High School in 1956.
 1919  The Provo bench area incorporated as a town and dubbed itself Orem.
 February 1919  Provo's Congregational and Methodists merged to form the Provo Community Congregational Church.52
 4 July 1919  Provo's official Independence Day celebration began and eventually grew into the largest celebration of its kind in the country.
 1922  Ironton plant built by Columbia Steel Company in south Provo.
 1923  The Proctor Academy, a parochial school run by the Congregational Education Society, was sold to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (B.P.O.E.). The Elks had been in Provo since 1903.
 May 1924  First zoning ordinance passed by Provo, the first Utah municipality to create a zoning  commission and pass such a law.53
 1925  Timpanogos Golf Course opened with 9 holes.
 26 January 1926   City agreed to sell its share of the City-County building to Utah County.
 1926  Pacific States Cast Iron Pipe Company established.
 15 December 1926  City-County Building completed and dedicated.
 9 February 1929  Provo Motor Company, an auto dealership, opened February 9, 1929 at 145 North University Avenue. The company was operated by G. M. Brockbank and John L. Coburn.54
 11 February 1930  The Provo Flour Mill, built in 1875 and located at 500 North 200 West, was completely destroyed by fire.55
 1930  A vocational school began which held classes in various parts of Central Utah until 1941 when it was placed directly in the Provo School district to administer.
 1931  First services of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, part of the Missouri Synod.56
 1931  Dixon Jr. High and Farrer Jr. High both opened. Although the facilities first opened at this time, classes for these grades had been taught by the High School staff in the "Jr. High building" near the old High School since about 1920.
 29 July 1935  First Cub Scout Pack in city begun by Provo Community Congregational Church.57
 December 1936  City's first Christmas parade.58
 1938  Provo Post Office dedicated at 90 West 100 North, north of the Federal Building.59
 5 August 1938  Museum in Sowiette Park officially opened.60
 late 1930s  With WPA assistance streets were paved, sewer lines extended and waterworks were built.61
 1938  The WPA built a clubhouse/dance hall on the site of the golf course. Photographs of the  building under construction are part of the "Remembering Provo" project: Golf Course Building and Golf Course Building 2
 1938  Original Timpanogos Elementary School was razed to make way for the next Timpanogos Elementary School.
 19 February 1939  The Utah Stake was divided creating the Provo Stake. The Provo Stake consisted of the Provo 1st, 5th, Manavu and Bonneville Wards. The Utah Stake retained the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, and Pioneer Wards.
 1939  A new Timpanogos Elementary School opened.
 1939  Joaquin School opened, replacing the Parker School.
 1939  First members of the Jehovah's Witnesses in Provo.62
 January 1940  Provo City completed construction of their own power plant and purchased the electrical distribution system from Utah Power and Light.63
 1940  Deer Creek dam and reservoir reaches completion.
 26 November 1940  The City began a survey which showed the people wanted a garbage and refuse disposal system, which was implemented shortly thereafter.64
 1941  Provo Seventh Ward created.
 25 November 1941  Deer Creek Dam completed, providing a major water resource for Provo. Deer Creek Dam is the main component of the Provo River Project and is an earthfill structure 235 ft high forming a reservoir with a capacity of 152,570 acre-feet. Located 16 miles northeast from Provo up Provo Canyon, the dam was constructed 1938-1941.65
 1941  First meeting of the Church of Christ in Provo. The Church started in Provo in 1941 and initially met in residential homes. By 1944 they acquired a large house at 867 East Center Street to meet in and in May of 1957 they relocated to 1055 South State Street in Orem.66
 1941  Deer Creek Reservoir completed.
 1941  The Utah Valley University opened in south Provo's old fairgrounds and buildings previously occupied by the Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.).
 1942  Assembly of God started.67
 1942  Provo purchased 160 acres of land in South Fork of Provo Canyon, including water rights on that land.68
 1942  Mural completed in the Federal Building by Everett C. Thorpe entitled "Early and Modern Provo". The mural was funded by the Treasury Department's Section of Painting and Sculpture (not WPA).
 1942  The City installed parking meters.69
 1943  Geneva Steel plant built in Vineyard. It opened in 1944 and continued in operation until 2001.
 11 May 1945  Church of the Nazarene organized with nine charter members.70
 1945  The Academy Theater opened in 1945 and finally closed on December 10, 1998. The theater had been located at 56 (later renumbered to 64) North University Avenue until it was torn down in the early months of 2004 to make way for the new Wells Fargo Building.
 1946  Provo Bible Church organized, which in 1965 became the Evangelical Free Church.71
 1948  Regal Lanes bowling alley opened, initially with just 12 lanes.73
 Barbizon Manufacturing Company came to Provo. Initially located on the block bounded by 100 North and 200 North, 100 West and 200 West. They later had to construct a new building up on 1230 North. The facility was closed sometime prior to September 1980.
 June 1948  Berg Mortuary was established in 1870 by Ole H. Berg and his son, Wyman. In the beginning they occupied a smaller facility at 40 East Center Street. In 1935 they purchased the Jesse Knight mansion at 185 East Center Street and moved their business to that location. Wyman and his son Max built an addition on the mansion increasing its size and the addition was completed in 1948. 
 June 1948  Granite Furniture opened at the corner of 500 West and 1230 North.
 23 July 1948  The "First Baptist Church" of Provo is located at 1144 Columbia Lane.74
 1949  Provo celebrated its centennial.
 1949  Grandview Elementary School opened.
 1950  The Provo Golf course came under city administration.
 1952  Deseret Industries opened a facility in Provo occupying first the "Blumenthal Building" on the corner of 500 West and Center Street. By 1965 they had constructed a new building for their operations.75
 1952  The Regal Lanes bowling alley burned down and was rebuilt larger with 24 lanes.76
 1954  The Utah Valley University (previously known as Utah Technical College) occupied its north wing at a new location on North University Avenue.
 1955  The new telephone company building at 99 East 100 North was finished and in use.77
 8 August 1955  Close vote of city voters in favor of council-manager form of government.78
 January 1956  Council-Manager government implemented, with Harold Van Wagenen as mayor.79
 1956  First informal meetings of Protestant ministers, known as the Utah Valley Ministerial Association.80
 1956  JoLene Company opened on West Center Street. The company grew and later relocated to 350 South 1050 West.
 5 March 1956  Earl Udall appointed city manager.81
 1956  The new Provo High School on North University Avenue opened.
 13 April 1960  Debate over relative merits of different forms of city government seen in The Daily Herald article "Provo Attains Real Progress in 4 Years of City Manager Government."82
 June 1961  Provo Post Office moved to 100 South 100 West.83
 7 November 1961  City voters rejected city manager form of government in favor of return to city commission.84
 19 December 1961  Verl Grant Dixon, who had strongly urged a return to the commission form of government, was chosen mayor in a special election.85
 January 1962  Verl Grant Dixon began first term as mayor.
 1963  The Central Utah Vocational School (now Utah Valley University) changed its name to Utah Trade Technical Institute.
 1965  Deseret Industries opened in a newly dedicated facility on North State Street. This remained in operation until they constructed a new facility just to the north.
 January 1966  Verl Grant Dixon began second term as mayor.
 1967  The Utah Trade Technical Institute was renamed the Utah Technical College.
 13 March 1968  After receiving input from several citizen committees, the city commission voted to build a new municipal building on Center Street.86
 20 August 1968  City voters approved propositions for general obligation bonds to pay for the new city building and additional city parks.87
 1972  City government offices moved to the City Center between 300 and 400 West Center Street.88
 1972  Provo City Housing Authority created.
 1972  University Mall opened in Orem bringing about a shift and decline in shopping in downtown Provo.
 July 1972  Provo City established the Redevelopment Agency to work on downtown parking problems.
 June 1974  Master plan for Central Business District (CBD) completed.
 1974  $195,000 in federal redevelopment funds secured for construction of CBD improvements, must be spent by 1 January 1975.
 March 1978  Immanuel Baptist Church started, but it ended in 1984 when its pastor left town.89
 1979  Novell was founded in Provo in 1979 with their headquarters located in Eastbay on 1800 South. Data Systems was incorporated in Provo. The name was changed in 1983 to Novell Inc.
 1981  Harvest Bible Fellowship organized.90
 1981  Victory Chapel, later renamed The Potter's House, started by Pastor Manuel Vallejos.91
 15 September 1982  Investors in Hawaii buy Knight Block and make commitment for its renovation.
 7 November 1983  Fifteen downtown businesses had formal ribbon cutting ceremony for renovation project called Provo Towne Square at University Avenue and Center Street.92
 1984  Utah County's first interfaith conference involving Mormons, Catholics, and Protestants held   at the Waterford School.93
 12 July 1984  Religious Freedom Rally held at Excelsior Hotel.94
 March 1985  Shriver's Clothing Store closed after 59 years of operation, then building purchased by investors in Hawaii.95
 18 January 1986  JCPenney's at 85 West Center Street closed.
 1989  The Provo City Library relocated to the City Center Building at 451 West Center Street.
 1990  Provo City Fire Department under Chief Bill Blair celebrated its centennial with several community activities.
 July 1999  Page School was razed and replaced with a parking lot.96
 8 September 2001  Academy building and new wing dedicated as the new Provo City Library at Academy Square.
 2002  Provo was one of the venues of the 2002 Winter Olympics, featuring the Men's and Women's Hockey competitions.
 November 2004  Hotel Roberts, having closed the previous year, was razed.
 2006  Timpanogos Elementary school was demolished to make way for a new elementary   school.
 Spring-Fall 2006  Asen Balakchiev created the mural "History of Provo" along Freedom Blvd (200 West) just south of Center Street.97
 17 December 2010  Provo Tabernacle destroyed by fire.
 October 2011  Provo City Center Temple announced to replace the burned down tabernacle.
 March 2016  Provo City Center Temple dedicated.
 August 2018  UVX (Utah Valley Express), Utah County's first bus rapid transit, opened.

Notes

1 The Provo River begins in the High Uintas and descends down through the Provo Canyon into Utah Valley and empties into Utah Lake. 

2 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J.C. Moffitt, 1975), 122.  

3 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J.C. Moffitt, 1975), 265.

4 Ellis Eames is listed as mayor in the very first city council minutes, 28 Apr 1851

5 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J.C. Moffitt, 1975), 265.

6 Kenneth L. Cannon II, Provo & Orem: A Very Elligible Place, An Illustrated History (Northridge, Calif.: Windsor Publications, 1987) 121. 

7 Kenneth L. Cannon II, Provo & Orem: A Very Elligible Place, An Illustrated History (Northridge, Calif.: Windsor Publications, 1987) 121.

8 George Washington Bean, Autobiography of George Washington Bean, a Utah Pioneer of 1847, and His Family Records (Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah Printing Co., 1945).

9 Kenneth L. Cannon II, Provo & Orem: A Very Eligible Place: An Illustrated History (Northridge, CA: Windsor Publications, 1987), 121.

10 George Washington Bean, Autobiography of George Washington Bean, a Utah Pioneer of 1847, and His Family Records (Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah Printing Co., 1945).

11 Inventory of the County Archives of Utah. No. 25. Utah County (Provo) (Ogden, Utah: Utah Historical Records Survey, 1940), 33.

12 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 91-93.

13 Provo, Pioneer Mormon City (American Guide Series) (Portland, OR: Binfords & Mort, 1942), p. 116. 

14 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 123; Kenneth L. Cannon, Provo & Orem: A Very Eligible Place: An Illustrated History (Northridge, Calif.: Windsor Publications, 1987) 121.

15 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 126.

16 The Daily Herald, 11 Feb 1930, 1.

17 "Excelsior Roller Mills," Deseret Evening News, 15 Dec 1900, p. 20.

18 Kenneth L. Cannon, Provo & Orem: A Very Eligible Place: An Illustrated History (Northridge, Calif.: Windsor Publications, 1987) 121.

19 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 284.

20 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 149.

21 Kenneth L. Cannon, Provo & Orem: A Very Eligible Place: An Illustrated History (Northridge, Calif.: Windsor Publications, 1987) 121.

22 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 128.

23 "New Chapel Caps 75-Year History of Community Church," Daily Herald, 25 Oct 1956, p. 18

24 "New Chapel Caps 75-Year History of Community Church," Daily Herald, 25 Oct 1956, p. 18. 

25 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 128.

26 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 129.

27 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 103.

28 Inventory of the County Archives of Utah. No. 25. Utah County (Provo) (Ogden, Utah: Utah Historical Records Survey, 1940), 33.

29 The Daily Herald, 8 Jul 1990, E1.

30 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 46.

31 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 29.

32 David M.  Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 70-71.

33 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 285.

34 John Clifton Moffitt, A Century of Public Education in Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: [s.n.], 1944) 52, 69-70.

35 John Clifton Moffitt, A Century of Public Education in Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: [s.n.], 1944) 52.

36 Wm. M. Wilson, Pictorial Provo: An Illustrated Industrial Review of Provo, the Garden City of Utah ([Provo: The Commercial Club], 1910).

37 Emma N. Huff, compiler, Memories that Live: Utah County Centennial History (Provo, Utah: Daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1947), 126.

38 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 125.

39 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 86.

40 William M. Wilson, Pictorial Provo: An Illustrated Industrial Review of Provo, the Garden City of Utah (Provo, Utah: The Commercial Club, 1910).

41 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 134.

42 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 82.

43 J. Marinus Jensen, History of Provo, Utah [Provo, Utah: J.M. Jensen], 1924, 229.

44 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 129.

45 Sunday Herald, 23 Feb 1958, p. 1-C.

46 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 129.

47 "New Chapel Caps 75-Year History of Community Church," Daily Herald, 25 Oct 1956, p.18

48 "Not Much Ado Over Demise of Y's Page School", Deseret News, 16 Jun 1999.

49 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 272.

50 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 284.

51 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 126.

52 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 31.

53 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 288.

54 Evening Herald, 30 Jan 1929, p. 1

55 The Daily Herald, 11 Feb 1930, 1.

56 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 105.

57 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986), 34.

58 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 291.

59 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 132.

60 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 292.

61 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 284-285.

62 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 119.

63 Max C. Elliott, "An Economic Study of Provo and Surrounding Area with Reference to Industry," unpublished paper "submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Pacific Coast Banking School.., August 1961, p. 34.

64 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 287.

65 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 286.

66 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 133.

67 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 140.

68 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 283.

69 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 287.

70 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 161.

71 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 151, 157.

72 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 166.

73 "Alley Owner Says Long Goodbye," The Daily Herald, 7 Apr 2002.

74 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 169.

75 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 166.

76 "Alley Owner Says Long Goodbye," The Daily Herald, 7 Apr 2002.

77 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 129.

78 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 274.

79 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 274.

80 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 207.

81 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 274.

82 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 274.

83 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 134.

84 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 274.

85 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 275.

86 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 294.

87 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 294-295.

88 John Clifton Moffitt, The Story of Provo, Utah (Provo, Utah: J. C. Moffitt, 1975) 294.

89 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 180-184.

90 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 186.

91 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 194.

92 Deseret News, 7 Nov 1983.

93 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 222.

94 David M. Walden, Protestant and Catholic Churches of Provo (Provo: Brigham Young University, Center for Family and Community History, 1986) 223.

95 Deseret News, 6 May 1985.

96 "Not Much Ado Over Demise of Y's Page School, Deseret News, 16 Jun 1999. 

97 Heidi Toth, "International Artist Helps Beautify Provo," Daily Herald, 10 Aug 2006, D1.