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VIRTUAL REALITY EXPERIENCES

Experience virtual reality with your family, friend, or activity group. 


The library has several pairs of Oculus Quest 2 Virtual Reality headsets ready and waiting for you to come and experiment. Book an on-demand experience for your group and discover what virtual reality has to offer! 


Thinking this may be an isolating experience? Though we only offer two headsets at a time, we have the ability to screencast to tablets (which can be viewed larger on a TV) so everyone in your group can see what's happening. 


Virtual reality experiences are hosted in the Basement Creative Lab, located in the west tunnel of the parking garage level (there's a giant mural on the wall--you can't miss it!)


Requests must be made at least one week in advance; please wait for a confirmation email from a library staff member before assuming your time is reserved. Please note that sessions may be no longer than two hours (that's how long the batteries last!). 


The following is a list of apps currently available on the headsets:

  • Beat Saber
  • Epic Roller Coaster
  • Elixer
  • Journey of the Gods
  • Jurrasic World
  • Fruit Ninja
  • Star Wars: Vader Immortal
  • Rec Room
  • Ocean Rift
  • Google Tilt Brush
  • Wander
  • National Geographic Explorer
  • NASA Space Explorers
  • Gravity Sketch

Don't see what you want? Feel free to email us suggestions! Virtual reality is new for us, and we're still learning. 


A NOTE ON VIRTUAL REALITY FOR KIDS: 

Kids love to try VR! We recommend VR sessions for children over 8. If you are interested in bringing children to your VR session, here are a few things you might need to keep in mind: 

  • VR goggles are heavy; kids under eight may have a hard time getting the goggles to fit correctly and may complain of head or neck strain while playing. 
  • VR is easiest to adapt to for kids who are already reading; as a parent, you can look at the screencast from your child's VR headset but it can still be difficult to help them navigate their world if they can't read on-screen instructions. 
  • If you're switching between family members, you need to know that the headset's virtual boundaries need to be reset between each player. 
  • VR headsets can occasionally feel disorienting and may cause motion sickness. Sometimes our youngest players do get a little frightened of objects floating in the air around them. 
Virtual Reality Request Form